February 2016

February 24, 2016

Twenty-eight students from Grand View Middle School competed at the 2016 Cherokee County Science Fair on Tuesday, February 2nd. Out of the twenty-eight students, eight students placed in their category. 
Front row L-R:  Cesar Sierra, Senior Division 2nd place in Engineering; Daphne Eidson, Senior Division 1st place in Behavioral Science; Danielle Chanate, Junior Division 3rd place in Biology; Breanna Stewart, Senior Division 1st place in Biology
Back row L-R: Jolene Thompson Senior Division 3rd place in Medicine and Health; Caden Goss Senior Division 3rd place in Biology; Gracyn Crittenden, Senior Division 3rd place in Physics; Charley Kelley Senior Division 2nd place in Medicine and Health

 
 

February 23, 2016

 
Eighth grader, Ty Fixin, was recently named to the All Tournament Team at the Organization of Rural Elementary Schools State Tournament held in Shawnee, OK. Ty played for Grand View School in the Division I Boys tournament. When asked how he felt about being named to the All Tournament Team, Ty said, "I was very excited when I found out Saturday after the game"

February 19, 2016

Basketball teams are State bound.

February 18, 2016

Grand View RoboChargers compete

February 18, 2016 from Tahlequah Daily Press

The Grand View School RoboChargers competed at their second robotics tournament on Jan. 30 at Keys Elementary School.

The teams experienced success, with one team ranking second in its division and almost qualifying to compete in the final rounds. The first-year teams worked successfully under pressure through the engineering process.

The Cherokee Nation Foundation donated two VEX IQ sets, which will enable Grand View to have a younger team of fifth- and sixth-graders. Cherokee Data Solutions donated a $250 scholarship for parts to the RoboChargers. This will help the team buy new parts when the game for 2016-2017 is revealed in April.

The team has also received support and instruction from Sequoyah High School, Northeastern State University, Tahlequah Public Schools, and others.

February 15, 2016

Grand View parents worried about school’s future

February 15, 2016 by Renee Fite from Tahlequah Daily Press

Concern over Grand View School’s possible closure brought about 100 parents and staff to hear Derald Glover, Fort Gibson Schools superintendent, speak Thursday night about funding and the future of rural schools.

Grand View also hosted the Do Your Best Parent University, with several community service providers and educational representatives set up at tables around the room.

Ideas for supporting the school, encouragement to contact legislators, and the financial impact schools will experience due to budget cuts were shared by Glover. He pointed out oil drives the economy in Oklahoma.

“Income tax is our most stable revenue,” he said.

Glover explained tax cuts since 2005 have cut the state’s revenue by about $3 billion, with the average tax payer receiving about $19 a month in return, while oil and gas industries have received more than $200 million in tax incentives since 2008.

He asked students in the audience if they would like a four-day week and got a positive response.

“Will a four-day week save money? I’ve put the pencil to paper, and it doesn’t save enough to make it worthwhile,” said Glover. “Ask your legislators to make education a priority in actions. Tell them you can’t support them if they can’t.”

 

Two seats are coming open due to term limits: those held by Sen. Earl Garrison and Rep. Mike Brown.

“Put someone in there who will make your child’s education a priority. Tell [him] – and I mean the people running for election, ‘If you won’t fight for us, we’ll get someone in there who will,’” he said. “We are the top state in the nation in education cuts.”

February 12, 2016

Grand View School recently received a Celestron Handheld Digital Microscope donated by the Tahlequah Rock and Mineral Society. Grand View's Technology Director, Trevor Crouch, assisted in connecting the microscope to the school's smartboard so students could see items projected and enlarged.  The microscope has the ability to magnify up to 200x.  TRAMS also donated 12 samples of items students can use to magnify. Mr. Rhoads enlarged those items and the students took turns guessing what the item was. "This microscope can give you a perspective, or view, that you can't see with your eye," science teacher, Brett Bryant, informed the students. Pictured L-R: TRAMS representatives Sally Brasel and Darryl "Dusty" Rhoads, Trevor Crouch, and Brett Bryant.